2019 Open Scholarship in Practice

Event Date & Time

  • October 25, 2019
    8:30 am - 3:30 pm

Event Description

Open scholarship, which encompasses open science, open access, open data, open education, and all other forms of openness in the scholarly and research environment, is transforming how knowledge is created and shared.

Join us for a full day of hands-on workshops exploring the practice of open scholarship from new tools that can increase the reproducibility of research to new pedagogies that become possible when students and faculty members become co-creators engaged in meaningful, generative knowledge creation. Hear from UBC colleagues who are incorporating “openness” in innovative ways to enhance teaching, research, and public impact.

All events are free and open to all but registration is required. Lunch and coffee breaks provided. Space is limited so please register by October 10

The U15 Group of Canadian Research Universities have stated that “the U15 is committed to disseminating scholarly publications and other research outputs as widely as possible in order to maximize their economic, cultural, social and health benefits, and the effectiveness of public investments in research…An individual or an institution’s access to research results should not be limited by their ability to pay for that access.The U15 encourages the collaborative development of new models of scholarly communications that would benefit the academy and the public by leveraging the power of the digital age in ways that enhance the quality of scholarly and scientific publications.”

Schedule

8:30 – 9:00am: Registration and Coffee

Location: Koerner, Rm 540 (open space)

9:00 – 9:15am: Welcome

Location: Koerner, Rm 548/552 (60)

Presenters:

  • Jason Pither, Associate Professor, Biology/Braes Institute – UBC Okanagan 

 

9:15 – 10:15 am Keynote Deftly Divulging Delicate Data – Exploring the complexities of intermingling Security, Privacy, and Open Science

Working with sensitive research data can be challenging; doing so in open collaborative research projects even more so. This session will examine these challenges for researchers collaborating across provincial and international borders; multi-institutional policies and governance; and what work still needs to be done in this area. Looking at the entire data-life-cycle, we will examine the different privacy and security implications at each stage; referencing how this fits into funder policies and legislative requirements both provincially, nationally, and internationally. Known solutions will be highlighted and the remaining unanswered questions and challenges identified. Participants will be offered practical advice, tips, and solutions that will help support secure open collaboration with a focus on facilitating research while maintaining compliance.

*This session will be livestreamed. Please click here on the day of the event.

Presenters:

  • Scott Baker, Manager, Sensitive Research for UBC Advanced Research Computing – Scott Baker is the Manager, Sensitive Research for UBC Advanced Research Computing, A team of privacy and security professionals focused on assisting researchers with effective and balanced solutions for safety and compliance. He is also the leader of the CARA IT-SIG, represents WestGrid on the Compute Canada security council, and has over 20 years of experience managing people, projects, and systems. Scott has a passion for information security management and governance, having honed his experience from electrical engineering for regional and national fibre optic networks through web application

Location: Koerner, Rm 548/552 (60)

10:30 to 10:45: Break/Refreshments

Location: Koerner, Rm 540 (open space)

10:45 – 12:00 pm Concurrent Sessions:

Introduction to Pressbooks for Authoring Textbooks

Are you thinking of writing an open textbook, but wondering how to start? This session will cover the basics of Pressbooks, the BCcampus system for authoring and sharing open textbooks. Learn about its core functionality, compiling front and back matter, open licencing considerations, and strategies for sharing and preserving your work.  There will be hands on components so please bring a laptop.

Presenters:

  • Erin Fields, Liason Librarian and Flexible Learning Coordinator
  • Amanda Grey, Open Education Student Librarian
  • Lucas Wright, Senior Educational Consultant (CTLT)

Location: Koerner, Rm 217 (35)

Making your Data Open

Toying with making your research data open? Explore some of the considerations needed to ensure your data isn’t just stored in the cloud and publicly accessible, but is findable, usable, and trustworthy enough to contribute to the world of open data.  From your ethics application through to final storage options we’ll look at what makes open data valuable data.

Presenters

  • Mathew Vis-Dunbar, Southern Medical Program Librarian – UBC Okanagan Library
  • Jeremy Buhler Data Librarian Humanities & Social Sciences – UBC Vancouver

Location: Koerner, Rm 548 (30)

Integrating Open Science into the Graduate Student Workflow

Research workflows that adhere to best practices in open science not only facilitate reproducibility, but also provide structure and peace of mind to early career researchers. This session will demonstrate examples of such workflows to graduate students and post-docs, drawing on tools such as the Open Science Framework, and will include round-table discussions of how these workflows enhance the collaborative lab setting.

Presenters:

  • Jason Pither, Associate Professor, Biology/Braes Institute – UBC Okanagan

Location: Koerner, Rm 540 (open space)

12:00 – 1:00 pm – Lunch (provided)

1:00 – 2:15 pm – Lightning Talk – Showcase

In this lightning talk session we will feature open scholarship innovation at UBC, including:

    • Search Data by Location: Geodisy Project (Mark Goodwin, MLIS; Geospatial Metadata Coordinator, Paul Dante, MSc (Geoscience); Software Engineer
    • Open Source Logic Homework System (Kyle Mas and Tristan MacKinlay, Research Assistants)
    • UBC Open Data Working Group (Marcela Hernandez, UBC Chief Data Officer )
    • Database of Religious History (M. Willis Monroe, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Asian Studies
    • Downtown East Side Research Access Portal (Angela Towle, Academic Director of the Learning Exchange)

Location: Koerner, Rm 548/552 (60)

2:15 – 3:30 pm – Concurrent Sessions

Open publishing infrastructures for open scholarship: The “Mind the Gap” study.

Open scholarship relies on open publishing infrastructure. The latter, while thematically and sometimes materially connected to open scholarship discourses, is a large and complex area of development on its own. A Mellon-funded landscape study on open-source publishing systems, “Mind the Gap” was released this past summer. The reports’ authors will present key findings from the report and discuss the possible sustainability models required to ensure these systems continue to support research communication.

Mind the Gap:  A Landscape Analysis of Open Source Publishing Tools and Platform

Presenters:

  • John Maxwell, Associate Professor and Director, Publishing Studies at Simon Fraser University
  • Erik Hanson, UBC iSchool

Location: Koerner, Rm 552 (30)

Minimal computing: one approach to the challenge of computational reproducibility

Computational reproducibility is a pan-disciplinary challenge with the ubiquitous rise of digital scholarship, the use of digital tools and methods in the research process either to supplement traditional research methods or explore new approaches. For work to be computationally reproducible consideration must be placed towards the long term sustainability and shareability of both the research workflow and research outputs. One approach to addressing this issue is to embrace the concept of minimal computing which leverages light and durable computing methods and digital formats to create shareable, sustainable, research outputs. This talk will provide an overview of computational reproducibility as an issue in the research lifecycle and introduce minimal computing.

Presenters:

  • Eka Grguric, Digital Scholarship Librarian – UBC Vancouver Library

Location: Koerner, Rm 217 (35)

Open Allies: Exploring student-driven advocacy for OERs at UBC

As textbook costs rise, students have become engaged partners in the open education movement. With their annual #TextbookBroke campaign, the Alma Mater Society (AMS) has been able to mobilize the student voice and create change in the open education framework at UBC. Facilitated by student leadership from the AMS, we will visit the history of student advocacy for OERs and reimagine ally-ship between instructors and students in the push for open education. This session hopes to showcase student advocacy successes, like the brand-new OER fund, as well as explore strategies for students and faculty to effectively collaborate on open advocacy.

Presenters

  • Julia Burnham is a fifth year student in Canadian and Indigenous studies at UBC. She currently serves as Vice President, Academic and University Affairs of the AMS, and co-chair of the Student Senate caucus. Julia has previously coordinated the #TextbookBroke campaign and led its reframing to a faculty-focused message.
  • Neha Tadepalli is a fourth year Political Science undergraduate student at UBC, currently serving as Campaigns and Outreach Commissioner for the AMS. In this role, she has worked extensively on Open Education, co-ordinating the #TextbookBroke Campaign, highlighting OER Champions on campus and further developing AMS advocacy for Open Scholarship.

Location: Koerner, Rm 548 (30)

**All events are free and open to all but registration is required.